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  Topic Review (Newest First)
07-04-2018 15:20
rayrecrok I ran aground In Brid Harbour entrance right in front of all the holiday makers, I was pushing the bottom of the tide to get in to let off a group of divers at the fish dock about as far down the harbour I could get..
If you keep hard to the right of the entrance you can scrape in as the tide running out makes a channel, except holiday makes hire rowing boats out of the harbour, and there was two of them flailing about in the harbour entrance and you cant see anything until you commit for the channel.

I blew my horn but the gormless buggers hadn't the gorm to get out of the way so I had to go for the middle and promptly ran aground in front of the holiday makers thronging the harbour, all pointing at us.. Luckily the 21ft Atlantic lifeboat was flying about doing an exhibition for the holiday makers so I called them on the radio and they came across to help, they tied up to the back of the boat and gave it some to pull us off the sandbank, their boat was stood on it's transom like an angry horse flailing about but we never moved.. I told them to fasten to the front of our boat and pull us round and we came straight off and had to go back out to sea, much to the amusement of the holiday makers..

Then a 4 hour wait for the tide to give us enough water to get in!.. So much for local knowledge, scuppered by some idiots in rowing boats..

ray.
07-04-2018 12:39
nicholsong Having sailed in the Med with no tides ever since the last time I had to consider a tide, which was when I crossed the Channel from Souhampton to Le Havre 30 years ago. It was a 12 hour crossing at night in a flat calm, so I calculated that the tidal drift down Channel and up would cancel out, so I set a course to steer and the Seine estuary came up bang on the nose.

Had the mast lifted at Le Havre and then had to calculate the tide time to leave at the start of the flood to reach Rouen to moor up in one tide, because mooring up below Rouen is almost impossible and I did not fancy having to drop anchor in the river on a falling tide. Anyway we made it OK. My boat cruised at 6knots but I reckon we were hitting 10 knots over the ground at times, so an easy passage. I think we made Paris the next day and went through the lock into L'Arsenale basin to moor - a great place because one is right in th middle of Paris in one's own accomodation for just the cost of a mooring fee.

Then no more tides in my sailing life.

When I was racing in a '12-metre' Class we had one famous grounding in the Sound at Ile de Chausse off Granville on the Contentin Peninsula; we had raced there from Jersey and had a great night in the hotel - very pissy. We were moored in the Sound running roughly N-S and with a westerly wind the skipper decided we would have a bit of a swank, sail to the South end and back up through the sound on a beam reach. We must have been doing 12 knots and probably looked great from the hotel. We had of course calculated the tide, but the problem with the Sound is that the sandbanks in the narrow part shift, so one cannot rely on the chart. We therefore had a couple of the crew conning depths from the bow. We drew 9' and it is not easy to judge depth to within a foot or so and being 70' overall the depth sounder was a long way back from the leading edge of the keel. Well, we grounded and stopped in metres - but only on sand.

It was a falling tide, so we knew we were there till the next tide. We heeled over at 45 degrees and moving about was difficult; I went down for a sweater from my bunk in thhe bow and crawling through was disorientating, so much so that my vision and my ear channels were giving different signals about which way was 'Up', consequently by the time I got back to the cockpit I actually felt seasick - on a stationary boat!

Our other grounding was at Cowes. We had won the Britannia Cup on the Tuesday and were racing in the NY Trophy on Thurs. We were well ahead of the field and close in to the Island shore approaching Cowes. We knew about 'Nicholson's Hump' and the Nav thought we had cleared it - but no. That cost us the race. However, with out very amateur crew and only one suite of sails we were well satisfied with the Britannia Cup win. Graeme Godfrey was a great owner and skipper to sail with and it was a privlege.

Sailors' Yarns over.

Geoff
07-04-2018 11:03
rayrecrok When I first started diving I joined Wakefield BSAC which at the time was just a load of political arseholes climbing over each other to get some poxy position on the committee, or took the club boat and nobody else could get it off them, I lasted 3 years then moved on to Kirklees dive club where I stayed for another 39 years..

The first dive I went on maybe to Weymouth or one of the dive sites darn sarf sticks in my mind, we met at the harbour and the guy organising the dive said right lets get the dive boats in fine except for one thing there was no water just a load of black slimy mud, so everybody started sliding the boats out wading through the stench, I looked on in disbelief!..

I kept my gob shut until we got back, the dive was a disaster from start to finish, the tide was running that fast divers were bottling out or those that did dive were coming up all over the place.. So when we met in the pub later I asked "Do you work the tides out" and just got blank stares back, so I said would you mind if I did it for tomorrows dive, I got the job for the next 40 years, I think they were glad they didn't have to wade through mud and the tide was slack when they went in.

ray
07-04-2018 06:59
Drew I've been deep sea fishing all over the world for over 60 years Jean and still don't understand the tides. I know what fish to target in different tides and thats it.

I'm sitting here just now when I should be in Weymouth, our fishing trip was called off this morning at 0500, and there is no way I could could go back to bed.
06-04-2018 20:41
jiwawa Thanks Rob - I think!
06-04-2018 18:40
Robell
Quote:
Originally Posted by nicholsong View Post
Rob

You chickened out and lifted it

I am not sure I could have done it.

Geoff
Guilty as charged (thanks to Google and Bristol Nomads)

Rob
06-04-2018 17:35
nicholsong
Quote:
Originally Posted by rayrecrok View Post
Yes should have said fastest on Spring tides..

And Spring tides are nothing to do with seasons but the moons phases as it is the moon that influences tides with the sun to a lesser degree but how they line up together, when the sun and moon line up either side of the earth they pull the water towards them by gravitational pull, when they are not opposite or lined up the gravitational pull on the sea is less, hence neap tides , spring tides occurs on the full and no moon, neap tides are when there is half moon showing, the water lump follows the celestial bodies gravitational pull as we revolve and the lump of water is pulled round the earth and that is what we call tides, the greatest range is at both Spring and Autumn equinoxes. All tidal predictions are affected by metrological conditions of the time hence tidal surges in gales..

Hard to explain without a blackboard and a bit of chalk

ray.
Ray

I knew what you meant but I did not want the kiddy-winkies to be confused.

Blackboard and 'chalk and talk' - much my preferred way of learning, because the talker had to know their stuff or they got caught out.

Originally all Pilots' technical courses were conducted like that by an Engineer Instructor qualified on the aircraft type.

Then the likes of Boeing started to produce programmes on computers which were based on the principle of 'You only need to know about the switches you can operate and the checklists'. There was no Engineer to answer questions. I am surprised the British CAA approved it.

I was not happy with this and wanted to know more about each system behind the switch, for when it all 'does not go to plan and follow the book'. At least one then has a chance of working round the problem with an alternative strategy.

In the same way I am not sure I would be happy flying an Airbus aircraft which is all fly-by-wire through the computers, with no mechanical connection to the controls and therefore no reversionary back-up in the event of computer failures(there are 3, with comparisons). At least on Boeings, even with hydraulic control surface failure we could, with a lot of physical effort, control the aircraft, which we practised in the simulator.

Bye for now from

Rambling Geoff Rumpole
06-04-2018 17:00
rayrecrok Yes should have said fastest on Spring tides..

And Spring tides are nothing to do with seasons but the moons phases as it is the moon that influences tides with the sun to a lesser degree but how they line up together, when the sun and moon line up either side of the earth they pull the water towards them by gravitational pull, when they are not opposite or lined up the gravitational pull on the sea is less, hence neap tides , spring tides occurs on the full and no moon, neap tides are when there is half moon showing, the water lump follows the celestial bodies gravitational pull as we revolve and the lump of water is pulled round the earth and that is what we call tides, the greatest range is at both Spring and Autumn equinoxes. All tidal predictions are affected by metrological conditions of the time hence tidal surges in gales..

Hard to explain without a blackboard and a bit of chalk

ray.
06-04-2018 15:49
nicholsong Ray

I think this in your post needs editing

"The tidal speeds are fastest on neap tides and have the shortest slack water, the slowest tides are on neap tides and give the longest slack water.."

Just to clarify.

Geoff
06-04-2018 15:35
rayrecrok Double high tides are caused by the tidal streams, when the tide is coming in it always comes from the north either side of the UK and both tides meet round the Solent area, the tides down the East side are squeezed through the straights of Dover which slows them down so arrive later than the tides that run down the West coast hence the time lag which gives double high tides..

Tidal drift means the amount of water on each tide moves south for about 19 miles then the tide ebbs and heads back North until low water but only goes for about 17 and a bit miles so the water is always heading South by about 1 and a bit miles every tide, we have diurnal tides which means two highs and two lows in one day...

Tides are worked all round the UK from a Standard Port and the point of reference for all tidal heights are a masons mark on the Harbour wall in the port of Newlyn if that's is how you spell it?..

The range of tides id the distance between one high and one low, the biggest range is on spring tides which is the highest high and the lowest low, neap tides are the lowest high and the highest low.. The tidal speeds are fastest on neap tides and have the shortest slack water, the slowest tides are on neap tides and give the longest slack water..

Loads on tides for anybody who is interested...

Ray Ex RYA navigation instructer..
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