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post #21 of 29 (permalink) Old 05-01-2009, 19:33
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Excellent reference, Keith

I have come across mention of minimum front axle weight in the context of adding a rear load. For motorhome traction with front wheel drive, this could be a problem, though probably only when one has a beefy rear axle. This picture on the Watling-Towbars scooter/ bikerack calculator page springs to mind:


However, finding information on minimum front axle load specifications is difficult. Your thoughts would be welcome.

Dave
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post #22 of 29 (permalink) Old 05-01-2009, 19:36
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Thanks for a really clear explanation.
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post #23 of 29 (permalink) Old 05-01-2009, 20:01
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Motorhome Weighing

Thanks you so much Sprokit for your effort - very informative and explanatory. Even a numpty like me can understand.

Thanks very much.

A Very Happy New Year to One and All.
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post #24 of 29 (permalink) Old 05-01-2009, 21:47
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Thanks sprokit. All now working. Dont know what the problems was but deleted first attempt downloaded again and all fine.
Thanks again
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post #25 of 29 (permalink) Old 05-01-2009, 21:52 Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DABurleigh
Excellent reference, Keith

I have come across mention of minimum front axle weight in the context of adding a rear load. For motorhome traction with front wheel drive, this could be a problem, though probably only when one has a beefy rear axle

However, finding information on minimum front axle load specifications is difficult. Your thoughts would be welcome.

Dave
Hi Dave

I've got lots of photographs similar to the one you put in your post - they all come from what used to be the Warsaw Pact countries and the Asian / Indian sub-continent......


However, to deal with your comment on safe minimum front axle weights, of course there is a limit to maintaining a safe minimum weight to prevent loss of traction on a FWD vehicle, just as there is a limit on any vehicle, think about steering and braking.

I wouldn't know where to look for minimum weights, but, it's worth bearing in mind that provided you don't exceed the maximum permitted weight over the rear axle, you don't need to worry about the front axle losing traction, this will have been taken care of during design.

Other than that, I've no idea, but do know that at the design weights maximum braking effort will be provided to each wheel at normal road speeds and steering / traction will be positive.

Perhaps one of our technical guys, I'm sure there must be someone with more than a smidgin of vehicle design experience amongst us, will be able to give a clearer answer.

Keith (Sprokit)
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post #26 of 29 (permalink) Old 22-01-2009, 00:42
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Hi Keith, I have only just come across this topic. I have downloaded your guide and it looks very useful thanks.

I have a query which is a little off topic but maybe you or others can help. I have searched the forums but have been unable to find any useful info.

My question is, when traveling abroad in countries such as France it is very common, usually in small towns, to see road signs displaying 3.5T and I wonder if this can be clarified. Does this relate to unladen weight or fully laden weight? Does it apply to all vehicles or only commercial vehicles which the locals don't want passing through their towns or villages?

Are there web pages for reference to the countries Highway Code info?

I have seen some signs which relate to bridges and I think it's pretty clear that these apply to all vehicles.
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post #27 of 29 (permalink) Old 22-01-2009, 10:49
 
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Guide to Motorhome weights

Just to add to the info from Sprokit, most local councils have weighbridges, often at their dustcart operating centre.

Such a useful article, much appreciated.
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post #28 of 29 (permalink) Old 22-01-2009, 21:12 Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by scept1c
..........I have a query which is a little off topic but maybe you or others can help. I have searched the forums but have been unable to find any useful info.

My question is, when traveling abroad in countries such as France it is very common, usually in small towns, to see road signs displaying 3.5T and I wonder if this can be clarified. Does this relate to unladen weight or fully laden weight? Does it apply to all vehicles or only commercial vehicles which the locals don't want passing through their towns or villages?

Are there web pages for reference to the countries Highway Code info?

I have seen some signs which relate to bridges and I think it's pretty clear that these apply to all vehicles.
Hi scept1c (strange name - is there a story behind it?)

The 3.5T sign is a maximum or Gross Vehicle Weight sign, and, is the same as that used in the UK to show that vehicles over the signed weight are not permitted within the area bounded by the signs. There are exceptions for vehicles making deliveries etc, but check the wording (never noticed any on French signs).

Don Madge has put a good link in a recent post on signing within Europe and here's another which is useful for all kinds of "Highway Code" type information. http://driving.drive-alive.co.uk/

Generally if you google whatever it is you're interested in and add the country name, it comes up with an answer.

HTH

Keith (Sprokit)
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post #29 of 29 (permalink) Old 18-03-2009, 20:20 Thread Starter
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A Guide to Motorhome weights & terms

Hi folks

Just a quick note to let you all know that the article relating to the Guide has now been updated and a section on driving licences added.

Please take a bit of time to have a look - it may just open your eyes and dispel a few myths.

Any comments are welcome. If you don't understand something, don't be afraid to ask - there's no such thing as a stupid question - others may have wanted to ask but are a little reticent. Ask either on the forum or, in a PM. I may not answer straight away, but I will answer.

Keith (Sprokit)
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